Irene

Your Home, Your Nest: More Important To Wellness Than You Might Think

In books, career, decorating, environment, health, home, job, lifestyle, nutrition, remodeling, renovation, shelter, Uncategorized, wellness on June 15, 2010 at 4:08 pm

Just as important as examining your nutrition is exploring the other areas of your life–because if you don’t fix what’s “eating” you, it will ultimately affect your diet and exercise.

What’s more important than your home?  It’s your shelter, the place that should make you feel safe and embraced after a long–and often–challenging day.  It’s the place where you play, work, and interact with family and  friends. And it’s often the very thing that can make you feel frustrated and unhappy because it doesn’t respond to the needs of your life.  But a few changes–often modest ones–could change all that.

Gale Steves, long-time home design editor and industry consultant, has written a definitive book for our times, Right-Sizing Your Home, available in bookstores or online retailers.

 Click onto http://search.barnesandnoble.com/Right-Sizing-Your-Home/Gale-C-Steves/e/9781926781044

Following are some excerpts from the book:

______________________________________________________________________________________________________

LEARNING TO RIGHT-SIZE

 Get Your Act Together

 It is all too easy to complain that your house doesn’t work for you, and that you should think about moving or maybe renovating.  Both are daunting prospects, especially these days.  Maybe just stay where you are and fume?  Nonsense!  You can—and should—do something about your living situation. Your home should be all you want it to be. Your home should have  the room you need.  For example, if you’re not dining formally, then do you need a dining room or are you actually eating in the family room most of the time?  Your home should fit your and your family’s lifestyles.

 Start Small 

There are remedies that don’t require such drastic measures as complete renovation or actually moving. Start with one room.  Take a step back and try to envision it as though you have never seen the room before; as though you were someone else, walking in for the first time.  How would that person react if you weren’t within earshot?  Too scary, perhaps to be so objective, but necessary.

 Picture This

 How about taking photos of the room? A couple of shots of the whole room, from different points of view, plus a couple of details will suffice.  Don’t move things around first, and don’t put things away that are always visible.  Take honest photos.  When you finally look at them, it will be like seeing yourself in a three-way dressing room mirror, when no one else is looking. What do you see? A worn out sofa covered with a blanket to hide the dog fur, or a stained carpet that’s created its own new patterns? Some mismatched lamps that hardly illuminate the room, or a lumpy chair whose springs are about to burst through the seat?  Have you been ignoring all this, or have you simply refused to undertake the task of making improvements? No matter—you’re about to start—right now!

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